Abstract

Brown J, Harding S, Bethune A, Rosato M. Longitudinal study of socio-economic differences in the incidence of stomach, colorectal and pancreatic cancers. Population Trends 1998; (94): 35-41.

Using the ONS Longitudinal Study, the incidence of stomach, colorectal and pancreatic cancers from 1976-90 was examined for men and women aged 30 years and over by their housing tenure and occupational social class. Large socio-economic differences in the incidence of stomach cancer for both men and women were found. The pattern of colorectal cancer was less clear, with women in more advantaged social groups experiencing higher incidence while for men there was no significant association. Pancreatic cancer showed no association with socio-economic status. Consistent findings with each indicator strengthen the interpretation of the results. Risk factors for these cancers are known to vary by socio-economic status, and this study demonstrates the importance of continued monitoring of the distribution of cancer incidence.